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Outputs

Cash for work program (including civil works contract)

 

1. Cash For Works (CFW)


I.    The CPMU has updated the CFW guidelines incorporating the lessons learned from the CFW implementation during the first phase. It has conducted a two day workshop cum training at Siem Reap not only to disseminate the updated CFW guidelines but also to train the line department officials on the requirements for a CFW sub-project implementation (proposal preparation, implementation and closing out). An exposure visit to a completed CFW and Civil Works road and canal sub-projects was also organized. A total of around 80 officials from MRD/PDRD, MOWRAM/PDOWRAM, PPMUs and CPMU participated in the workshop.
 


II.    Till 30 September 2015, the CPMU has approved a total of 381 CFW sub-project proposals (worth of around USD 3.83 million) out of which 337 are road rehabilitation sub-projects (worth of around USD 3.41 million) and 44 are canal rehabilitation sub-projects (worth of around USD 0.42 million).

 

Table 1: Status of Approved CFW Sub-Projects by Target Province (as of September 2015)

III.    Out of the approved 381 CFW sub-projects, 366 are completed and 15 got cancelled. The 366 completed sub-projects have engaged 23,928 beneficiary hhs (including 7,709 women headed hhs); rehabilitated 230.87 km of rural road and 24.68 km of tertiary canal (created irrigation potential of 2,706 ha for wet and 384 ha for dry seasons); and generated 956,346 labour days. Each participating beneficiary hhs earned around US$123.32 through a CFW sub-project (Annex IIIb).

IV.    The list of on-going and cancelled CFW  sub-projects are given in Annex IIIa.


2. Civil Works (CW) Contracts


V.    The CPMU has received 61 CW proposals (36 are road rehabilitation sub-projects and 25 are canal rehabilitation sub-projects) and approved 51 sub-projects (31 are road rehabilitation sub-projects and 20 are canal rehabilitation sub-projects). For the approved 51 sub-projects, 23 bids are prepared, tenders floated and contracts are awarded.
     
VI.    Till date, implementation of all the 51 CW sub-projects are completed while defect liability period for 34 subprojects completed. The 51 completed sub-projects rehabilitated 127.272 Km of rural road and 29.198 km of tertiary canal (created irrigation potential of 7,684 ha for wet and 1,234 ha for dry seasons); engaged 9,166 participating beneficiary hhs (including 1,633 women headed hhs); and generated 141,302 labour days (see Annex IIIc).

 

Table 2: Status of CW Sub-Projects by Target Province (as of September 2015)

VII.    The CPMU started and completed procurement of the Civil Work (CW) sub-project contracts to spread laterite on the completed CFW roads and CW canals in target provinces so as to strengthen them and prolong their longevity and quality. The CPMU prepared three (3) bids to spread laterite on 61 CFW roads with a total road length of 63.594 km and one (1) bids to spread laterite on 2 CW canals with a total road length of 7.9 km, floated tenders and awarded contracts (a total worth of around US$1.26 million). Implementation is on-going.

 

VIII.     After the discussion and agreement with the ADB Review Mission (30 March-1 April 2015), the CPMU has initiated and completed the procurement for the Civil Work (CW) sub-project contracts for installation of 3 water supply systems in Otdar Meanchey and Kampong Speu. A total worth of around US$0.34 million contract is awarded and implementation is on-going.

 

IX.    As tertiary canals/embankments were rehabilitated under the Project and in order to administer/maintain them after the project period and as a part of the exit strategy, the CPMU decided to handover them to farmer water users communities (FWUCs) through the MOWRAM/PDOWRAM. The CPMU conducted a half day workshop (on 10 September 2015) to initiate implementation of activities related to FWUC. The objectives of the workshop were (1) to introduce the Sub-decree no. 31 អនក្រ-បកdated 12.03.2015, on the Formation, Dissolution and Role and Responsibilities of FWUC in the Kingdom of Cambodia; (2) to inform the MOWRAM, PDOWRAM and PPMU about the EFAP-AF’s support for the formation of FWUC at the target provinces to administer the canals/embankments rehabilitated under the EFAP and EFAP-AF, and (3) to present tentative Work Plan and agree on the deadline of EFAP-AF’s support for the Formation of FWUC. A total of 52 CPMU, PPMU, MOWRAM and PDOWRAM Officials including 7 female Officials from 11 target provinces participated in the workshop.

 

X.    The CPMU received proposals for implementation of activities related to formation and training of FWUCs from the PDOWRAMs through the PPMUs. The CPMU has reviewed the proposals and endorsed them. The implementation is scheduled to start next month;

 

Table 3: Proposed number of Farmer Water Users Communities (FWUCs) to be formed


3. Cash For Works (CFW) and Civil Works (CW) Contracts Using Cash Collection from Subsidized Sale


XI.    The CPMU collected cash of around USD 3.24 million from the subsidized sale of inputs and remaining old and low quality inputs. After the endorsement from ADB, the CPMU is using the cash collection for (i) implementation of new CFW/CW sub-projects, (ii) lateriting of the completed CFW road and CW canal sub-projects, (iii) Construction of Community Dissemination and Training Centres, and (iv) Dissemination of Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for Cambodia Food Reserve System (CFRS).


Table 4: Cash Collection & Its Utilization

XII.    The CPMU continued implementation of the Cash for Work (CFW) scheme utilizing the cash collection in target provinces. As of 30 September 2015, the CPMU has approved 68 CFW sub-project proposals (worth of around US$0.78 million) out of which 67 are completed and 1 got cancelled. The 67 completed sub-projects rehabilitated 45.689 Km of rural road and 4.124 km of tertiary canal (created irrigation potential of 588 ha for wet and 42 ha for dry seasons); engaged 4,585 beneficiary hhs (including 1,444 women headed hhs) and generated 196,830 labour days. Each participating beneficiary hhs earned around US$121.97 through a CFW sub-project. (Annex IIId & IIIe)


Table 5: Status of Approved CFW Sub-Projects by Province (Use of Cash Collection)

XIII.    The CPMU started and completed procurement for spreading laterite on competed Cash for Work (CFW) road and Civil Works (CW) canals sub-projects utilizing the cash collection in target provinces. As of 30 September 2015, the CPMU prepared three (3) bids to spread laterite on 58 CFW roads with a total road length of 70.270 km and three (3) bids to spread laterite on 1 CW canal with a total road length of 2.136 km and CW rehabilitations of road with a total road length of 7.485 km, floated tenders and awarded contracts (a total worth of around US$1.49 million). Implementation is on-going.
XIV.    After receiving ADB’s no objection, the CPMU has initiated and completed procurement for the Civil Work (CW) sub-project contract for construction of Community Dissemination and Training Center in all the 100 target communes. A total worth of around US$0.75 million contract is awarded and implementation is on-going.

 

4. Summary of CFW scheme and CW contracts (Roads & Canals)


XV.    As described in above paras, the summary of accomplishment for the CFW program as a whole is as follows:

 

Table 6: Summary of Accomplishment of CFW Program


XVI.    Completed an in-depth analysis of the CFW program. Salient findings are:


-    the program was able to engage 65.38% of total poor HHs of the target areas, and met 13.24% of annual HH income of these poor HHs;;
-    a total of 209 HHs benefitted per irrigation project and 110 hectares of irrigation potential created;
-    a total of 88.9% HHs reported to be able to reduce food gap in between 1 to 3 months while 9.9% reduce food gap in between 4 to 6 months;
-    the rehabilitated roads served the purposes as they are able to reduce the travel time, connected to important social institutions and markets.

 

The detailed CFW benefit/impact assessment report is published and copy can be found in the EFAP website.